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on planet earth who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
-- mentioned that it has been declared a by california governor jerry brown, who will be visiting jpl later on. i want to start with our panel and introduce them. first we have michael meyer, the lead scientist for the mars exploration program in washington. we have the msl project manager for the jet propulsion laboratory. we have the physical investor of the -- investigator of the chem cam instrument from the los alamos laboratory in new mexico. next is the lead rubber plant at -- leader rover planner at jpl. also the principal investigator from chem cam in new mexico. last, the deputy project scientist at jpl. we will start with a special announcement from michael. >> before i make the announcement, which i think all of you will enjoy, i would like to show you a short video. this video was made on the eve of the arrival at mars -- this was in november of 1971. in the video, you will see a couple of people you might recognize -- bruce murray and carl sagan and ray bradbury. if we can look at that video -- >> i was hoping, during the last few days, as we get closer to mars and the dust cleare
who was watching. let's take a look at that moment in jpl when they got their confirmation. >> touchdown confirmed. we are safe on mars. >> [cheering] >> we are wheels down on mars. >> by the time they relayed the information curiosity had been on mars for seven minutes. look at the mix of triumph, relief and then unbridled joy as curiosity sent back the first images of the surface. thumbnails as they call them from each corner of the rover showing how sits and how it fares. it is the best possible outcome sharing this experience which is one reason why they came to watch at nasa aimes tonight. >> in a sometimes cynical, sometimes idealistic world it took an attempted landing on a different one, mars, to bring all of these people back to the aimes research center. >> this is eight and a half months of waiting at the end of a long mission. >> there are not too many mars landings in my lifetime, so i am glad to see one. >> it took the curiosity rover from space to the surface of mars. from an entry feet of 13 kilometers per second to 0 in ser harrowing minutes. a one-ton rove
-- in the michigan, team chief from jpl. and dougie ellison, visualization producer at jpl, and we will begin with michael watkins. >> a very good morning. we had another fantastic day on mars. curiosity continues to behave basically flawlessly. and executing all the planned activities successfully and phenomenal yesterday. a good time for me to point out that the team operating curiosity is performing basically it flawlessly and completing of planned activities. this is really just a great day all around. so the activity consists of a couple of different things. we are about to -- it would like to upgrade our software on the rover, just like we upgrade our uprighted system under on computer and laptop. we're going to do the same thing. we need a fellow that is optimized. we landed on one that is optimized for lending. but the same token the surface does not have the land the vehicle. you want to switch to this new flight software that is optimized for surface operations, and we're going to do that starting tomorrow. so a little prep work for that activity. we're going to check out the back u
jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter . guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be useful for explo
billion or more a piece have largely paid back the money. can you name some of the major banks? guest: jpl morgan, citibank -- j.p. morgan, citibank, goldman sachs paid back tarp. initially, $125 billion was given to the largest banks and it quickly paid back. host: and banks worth less than $10 billion a piece, and moneys outstanding versus what they paid back. what is it about the smaller banks giving them a harder time? guest: a lot of the smaller banks are not as healthy as the big banks. they also don't have easy access to the capital market, so it is harder for them to go out and raise capital to pay it back. host: here is a piece that you wrote for bloomberg a couple of weeks ago. the u.s. treasury department said it started selling stakes today -- first of all, why get out of it? why is of the treasury department trying to extricate itself from these banks? guest: hutras reece says it was never intended to be a lifelong shareholder of banks, so it was natural they would eventually get out. i think they are realistic probably will not do with this year. and probably will continue in
you. by the question, i think i saw a jpl blog post that rob manning won the bingo game of where it was going to land. curious if there's anything more than accolades with that guess? >> we had multiple bingo games among different groups of people. the biggest one was a giant poster, about 10 feet long, that was printed out. rob was the closest. he was one of what we call our grumlins who operated our readiness testing, so we believe he may have rigged the system somehow. [laughter] >> abbottabad in the room. >> i just wanted a little more information if any of you have it about the already iconic photograph of the parachutes descending with the rover below it. this picture had to be programmed far in advance -- is that right? >> yeah, that is right. we provided the first timing that we wanted this parachute picture to be taken way back in april. targeted for about six minutes after injury. the goal was to make sure that we focus on and if things do not go well. we wanted to see if we saw an inflated parachute or not an inflated parachute to see if there was a damage or not. so t
a bunch of former jpl employees on staff. host: kelly from massachusetts on our independent line. caller: you said you are giving companies $1.1 billion. why are we giving them money to reinvent the wheel? we already have the technology to get into space. why aren't we sharing the technology? guest: the companies are using nasa's technology to get into space. the space shuttle was an incredibly capable vehicle, but was not a cheap vehicle. it had a lot capabilities that we did not need. it was a vehicle that was good for lower earth orbits. they build two capabilities to replace it. the other is to go beyond lower earth orbit, but we did do with the apollo program. the space shuttle was a very high-tech vehicle but it wasn't the right vehicle for where we're going now. host: here are some numbers from 2011, looking at contract awards that were given how. host: these funds were given to companies. a question from monty on twitter. guest: the commercial applications can seem far- fetched. if you can find water, water can be turned into fuel that you can use to power a rocket. it can be use
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8